Spring Security by example: securing methods

This is a part of a simple Spring Security tutorial: 1. Set up and form authentication 2. User in the backend (getting logged user, authentication, testing) 3. Securing web resources 4. Securing methods 5. OpenID (login via gmail) 6. OAuth2 (login via Facebook) 7. Writing on Facebook wall with Spring Social Securing web resources is all nice and cool, but in a well designed application it’s more natural to secure methods (for example on backend facade or even domain objects). While we may get away with role-based authorization in many intranet business applications, nobody will ever handle assigning roles to users in a public, free to use Internet service. We need authorization based on rules described in our domain. For example: there is a service AlterStory, that allows cooperative writing of stories, where one user is a director (like a movie director), deciding which chapter proposed by other authors should make it to the final story. The method for accepting chapters, looks like this: Read more »
This is a part of a simple Spring Security tutorial:

1. Set up and form authentication
2. User in the backend (getting logged user, authentication, testing)
3. Securing web resources
4. Securing methods
5. OpenID (login via gmail)
6. OAuth2 (login via Facebook)
7. Writing on Facebook wall with Spring Social

Securing web resources is all nice and cool, but in a well designed application it's more natural to secure methods (for example on backend facade or even domain objects). While we may get away with role-based authorization in many intranet business applications, nobody will ever handle assigning roles to users in a public, free to use Internet service. We need authorization based on rules described in our domain.

For example: there is a service AlterStory, that allows cooperative writing of stories, where one user is a director (like a movie director), deciding which chapter proposed by other authors should make it to the final story.

The method for accepting chapters, looks like this:

Read more »

You May Also Like

JCE keystore and untrusted sites

Recently at work I was in need of connecting to a web service exposed via HTTPS. I've been doing this from inside Servicemix 3.3.1, which may seem a bit inhibiting, but that was a requirement. Nevertheless I've been trying my luck with the included ser...Recently at work I was in need of connecting to a web service exposed via HTTPS. I've been doing this from inside Servicemix 3.3.1, which may seem a bit inhibiting, but that was a requirement. Nevertheless I've been trying my luck with the included ser...

Me on Hadoop on Parleys

Finally I've managed to import my WarJUG presentation to parleys.com. See for yourself :) If you've got problems with opening the parleys' version try the ones uploaded to youtube. Here is part 1: And here is part 2: Finally I've managed to import my WarJUG presentation to parleys.com. See for yourself :) If you've got problems with opening the parleys' version try the ones uploaded to youtube. Here is part 1: And here is part 2: