GWT Hosted mode on 64bit linux

GWT for linux is build against 32bit architecture. It contains some SWT/GTK 32bit modules. So if you try to run it with 64bit java it failsException in thread “main” java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: /opt/tools/sdk/gwt/gwt-linux-1.5.3/libswt-pi-gtk-3235….

GWT for linux is build against 32bit architecture. It contains some SWT/GTK 32bit modules. So if you try to run it with 64bit java it fails

Exception in thread “main” java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: /opt/tools/sdk/gwt/gwt-linux-1.5.3/libswt-pi-gtk-3235.so: /opt/tools/sdk/gwt/gwt-linux-1.5.3/libswt-pi-gtk-3235.so: wrong ELF class: ELFCLASS32 (Possible cause: architecture word width mismatch)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader$NativeLibrary.load(Native Method)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadLibrary0(ClassLoader.java:1807)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadLibrary(ClassLoader.java:1703)
    at java.lang.Runtime.load0(Runtime.java:770)
    at java.lang.System.load(System.java:1003)
    at org.eclipse.swt.internal.Library.loadLibrary(Library.java:132)
    at org.eclipse.swt.internal.gtk.OS.(OS.java:22)
    at org.eclipse.swt.internal.Converter.wcsToMbcs(Converter.java:63)
    at org.eclipse.swt.internal.Converter.wcsToMbcs(Converter.java:54)
    at org.eclipse.swt.widgets.Display.(Display.java:126)
    at com.google.gwt.dev.GWTShell.(GWTShell.java:301)
Could not find the main class: com.google.gwt.dev.GWTShell.  Program will exit.
[INFO] ————————————————————————
[ERROR] BUILD ERROR

You have two choices. Find 64bit SWT/GTK modules with same build version (3235 in this case) – good luck! or download 32bit JRE.

I chose second option and it took me 3 mins to resolve the problem.
Find proper JRE version on Oracle site I suggest bin file instead rpm. It unpacks jre to own dir. Move that directory to some convenient location (it doesn’t matter where). Edit gwt.properties *and set java.executable* to java exec located in 32bit JRE.
Now run your GWT hosted mode and be unstoppable developer!

You may have some warnings from GTK, such as

/usr/lib/gtk-2.0/2.10.0/menuproxies/libappmenu.so: wrong ELF class: ELFCLASS64
(GWT:351): Gtk-WARNING **: Failed to load type module: /usr/lib/gtk-2.0/2.10.0
/menuproxies/libappmenu.so
**

But it has no consequences for me, so far…

Some sources say that you should set an environment var:

export LIBXCB_ALLOW_SLOPPY_LOCK=1

to block bugs in X display layer but I don’t know what does it mean :)

In this case I had to hadle with GWT version 1.5.3 (old corporate project)

 
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Thought static method can’t be easy to mock, stub nor track? Wrong!

No matter why, no matter is it a good idea. Sometimes one just wants to check or it's necessary to be done. Mock a static method, woot? Impossibru!

In pure Java world it is still a struggle. But Groovy allows you to do that really simple. Well, not groovy alone, but with a great support of Spock.

Lets move on straight to the example. To catch some context we have an abstract for the example needs. A marketing project with a set of offers. One to many.

import spock.lang.Specification

class OfferFacadeSpec extends Specification {

    OfferFacade facade = new OfferFacade()

    def setup() {
        GroovyMock(Project, global: true)
    }

    def 'delegates an add offer call to the domain with proper params'() {
        given:
            Map params = [projId: projectId, name: offerName]

        when:
            Offer returnedOffer = facade.add(params)

        then:
            1 * Project.addOffer(projectId, _) >> { projId, offer -> offer }
            returnedOffer.name == params.name

        where:
            projectId | offerName
            1         | 'an Offer'
            15        | 'whasup!?'
            123       | 'doskonała oferta - kup teraz!'
    }
}
So we test a facade responsible for handling "add offer to the project" call triggered  somewhere in a GUI.
We want to ensure that static method Project.addOffer(long, Offer) will receive correct params when java.util.Map with user form input comes to the facade.add(params).
This is unit test, so how Project.addOffer() works is out of scope. Thus we want to stub it.

The most important is a GroovyMock(Project, global: true) statement.
What it does is modifing Project class to behave like a Spock's mock. 
GroovyMock() itself is a method inherited from SpecificationThe global flag is necessary to enable mocking static methods.
However when one comes to the need of mocking static method, author of Spock Framework advice to consider redesigning of implementation. It's not a bad advice, I must say.

Another important thing are assertions at then: block. First one checks an interaction, if the Project.addOffer() method was called exactly once, with a 1st argument equal to the projectId and some other param (we don't have an object instance yet to assert anything about it).
Right shit operator leads us to the stub which replaces original method implementation by such statement.
As a good stub it does nothing. The original method definition has return type Offer. The stub needs to do the same. So an offer passed as the 2nd argument is just returned.
Thanks to this we can assert about name property if it's equal with the value from params. If no return was designed the name could be checked inside the stub Closure, prefixed with an assert keyword.

Worth of  mentioning is that if you want to track interactions of original static method implementation without replacing it, then you should try using GroovySpy instead of GroovyMock.

Unfortunately static methods declared at Java object can't be treated in such ways. Though regular mocks and whole goodness of Spock can be used to test pure Java code, which is awesome anyway :)No matter why, no matter is it a good idea. Sometimes one just wants to check or it's necessary to be done. Mock a static method, woot? Impossibru!

In pure Java world it is still a struggle. But Groovy allows you to do that really simple. Well, not groovy alone, but with a great support of Spock.

Lets move on straight to the example. To catch some context we have an abstract for the example needs. A marketing project with a set of offers. One to many.

import spock.lang.Specification

class OfferFacadeSpec extends Specification {

    OfferFacade facade = new OfferFacade()

    def setup() {
        GroovyMock(Project, global: true)
    }

    def 'delegates an add offer call to the domain with proper params'() {
        given:
            Map params = [projId: projectId, name: offerName]

        when:
            Offer returnedOffer = facade.add(params)

        then:
            1 * Project.addOffer(projectId, _) >> { projId, offer -> offer }
            returnedOffer.name == params.name

        where:
            projectId | offerName
            1         | 'an Offer'
            15        | 'whasup!?'
            123       | 'doskonała oferta - kup teraz!'
    }
}
So we test a facade responsible for handling "add offer to the project" call triggered  somewhere in a GUI.
We want to ensure that static method Project.addOffer(long, Offer) will receive correct params when java.util.Map with user form input comes to the facade.add(params).
This is unit test, so how Project.addOffer() works is out of scope. Thus we want to stub it.

The most important is a GroovyMock(Project, global: true) statement.
What it does is modifing Project class to behave like a Spock's mock. 
GroovyMock() itself is a method inherited from SpecificationThe global flag is necessary to enable mocking static methods.
However when one comes to the need of mocking static method, author of Spock Framework advice to consider redesigning of implementation. It's not a bad advice, I must say.

Another important thing are assertions at then: block. First one checks an interaction, if the Project.addOffer() method was called exactly once, with a 1st argument equal to the projectId and some other param (we don't have an object instance yet to assert anything about it).
Right shit operator leads us to the stub which replaces original method implementation by such statement.
As a good stub it does nothing. The original method definition has return type Offer. The stub needs to do the same. So an offer passed as the 2nd argument is just returned.
Thanks to this we can assert about name property if it's equal with the value from params. If no return was designed the name could be checked inside the stub Closure, prefixed with an assert keyword.

Worth of  mentioning is that if you want to track interactions of original static method implementation without replacing it, then you should try using GroovySpy instead of GroovyMock.

Unfortunately static methods declared at Java object can't be treated in such ways. Though regular mocks and whole goodness of Spock can be used to test pure Java code, which is awesome anyway :)